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Archaeologists

Israel Archaeology’s Pioneers, Currently Active and the Next Generation of Researchers and Teachers.
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Aharoni, Yohanan Image
Aharoni, Yohanan
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Tel Aviv University, Ramat Rahel, Tel Hazor
Bar-Yosef, Ofer Image
Bar-Yosef, Ofer
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Hebrew University
Historical Research Focus: Middle Paleolithic 80000 BC – 40000 BC
Brill, Robert H. Image
Brill, Robert H.
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Al-Jalama, Beth Shearim
Industrial Activity: glass making
Material Composition: Glass
Gophna, Ram Image
Gophna, Ram
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Tel Tsaf, Tel Aviv University
Historical Research Focus: Chalcolithic 4500 BC – 3150 BC
Settlement Types: Village
Goren-Inbar, Naama Image
Goren-Inbar, Naama
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Gesher Benot Ya‘aqov (GBY), Hebrew University
Historical Research Focus: Early Paleolithic 150000 BC – 80000 BC
Material Composition: Flint
Kenyon, Kathleen Mary Image
Kenyon, Kathleen Mary
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: The Palestine Exploration Fund, Jericho
Historical Research Focus: Late Bronze (LB) 1500 BC – 1200 BC
Material Composition: Pottery
Kochavi, Moshe Image
Kochavi, Moshe
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Tel Aviv University
Aharoni, Yohanan
Aharoni, Yohanan Image
Yohanan Aharoni was bom in Germany, June 7, 1919, and immigrated to Palestine in 1933. He began his public archeological career as Antiquities Inspector for Galilee, representing the Department of Antiquities of the newly founded State of Israel. He continued in this capacity during 1950-55and a survey that he conducted during those years culminated in his doctoral dissertation on The Settlement of the Israelite Tribes in Upper Galilee (published in Hebrew, Jerusalem. 1957). For four years he was staff archeologist on the Hazor Expedition as supervisor of Area A. where he uncovered the casemate wall and gate of the Solomonic period and was the first to date them correctly. In 1959 he became a research fellow at the Hebrew University and rose to the rank of associate professor (1966). His principal archeological activities during those years included the excavations at Ramat Rahel. Arad and Lachish (the temple area). Notable among the many fruits of those labors were the rich material finds, including architectural decorations, of the royal Judean palace at Ramat Rahel. the collection of cult vessels and the incense altar in a cult room at Lachish, and the temple and inscriptions of Arad. In 1968 Aharoni came to Tel Aviv University with the rank of full professor and chairman of the Department of Archeology and Ancient Near Eastern Cultures. He reorganized the department along regional lines with majors in: Eretz-Israel and Syria, Mesopotamia. Anatolia. Egypt and also Prehistory. He also organized the Institute of Archeology as a research body including laboratories (and liaison with other science labs in the university) and departments for the various activities of research and processing to serve the projects of the academic staff. In 1969 he launched the Beer-Sheba Negeb Excavations as a continuing phase of his previous Negev survey and his excavations at Arad. Two other sites, Tel Malhata and Tel Masos, were also excavated concurrently, using the same base camp at Beer-Sheba. To students of the Bible, Aharoni is probably best known for his Land of the Bible (London and Philadelphia, 1967), and the MacMillan Bible A lias (with M. Avi-Yonah; New York, 1968), textbooks thoroughly grounded in the written texts and the terrain of Israel. Before his death, he had completed the notes for a revision of both works. In these books and his many articles. Aharoni showed his devotion to the original sources and his ability to grasp the real life situations of antiquity. As a philologian, Aharoni demonstrated his talents in the publication of the Arad Inscriptions (Jerusalem. 1975), for which he received the Ben-Zvi Prize. His translations are simple, straight­forward and reflect the sound common sense of his interpretations. An English translation of this book contains a chapter by J. Navch on the Aramaic texts from Arad. Common sense was also the dominant feature in his approach to excavation. His use of sectional drawings can be illustrated from the Arad field books, dating back to 1962. But method was always adapted to the problems at hand and the basic goal was never forgotten: to elucidate the way of life on the site. Stratigraphy, including the differentiation of soil types, etc., was followed carefully, but even stratigraphy was never made an end in itself. Thus we have been enriched by an Israelite temple, a royal Judean fortress and a store city with its principal structures, store houses, apartments, etc. By his colleagues, Aharoni will be remembered as Yohanan. the quiet, unassuming, thoughtful scholar and friend, patient with his students and straightforward with all his associates. He had the courage to make decisions and carry them through and was unafraid to stand alone, even when the “establishment” was unable to digest the new implications of evidence he had uncovered. He had a simple faith that the facts would eventually find acceptance. Above all, he had what Rollo May has called “the courage of imperfection.” He never hesitated to abandon a previous view in the light of new evidence, a sure sign of an integrated and secure personality. On February 10, 1976. the career of this pioneer spirit was abruptly halted, just when he was reaching his stride in scholarly creativity and dynamic research. They say the Righteous in Gan-Eden spend their time studying Torah, but I can’t feature Yohanan sitting down all the time. Instead I envision him with his newly acquired Torah under his arm. setting out to survey the new terrain!
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Tel Aviv University, Ramat Rahel, Tel Hazor
Bar-Yosef, Ofer
Bar-Yosef, Ofer Image
Ofer Bar-Yosef is an Israeli archaeologist and anthropologist whose main field of study is the Palaeolithic period. He was Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology at Hebrew University in Jerusalem since 1967, the institution where he originally studied archaeology at undergraduate and post-graduate levels in the 1960s. https://harvard.academia.edu/OferBarYosef/CurriculumVitae
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Hebrew University
Historical Research Focus: Middle Paleolithic 80000 BC – 40000 BC
Brill, Robert H.
Brill, Robert H. Image
Dr Robert Brill is in the field of archaeological science, best known for his work on the chemical analysis of ancient glass. Born in the United States of America in 1929, Brill attended West Side High School in Newark, New Jersey, before going on to study for his B.S. degree at Upsala College, also New Jersey (Brill 1993a, Brill 2006, Getty Conservation Institute 2009). Having completed his Ph.D in Physical Chemistry at Rutgers University in 1954, Brill was to return to Upsala College to teach chemistry himself until 1960 when he joined the staff of the Corning Museum of Glass as their second research scientist (Corning Museum of Glass, 2009) The 1960s saw Brill beginning to develop the analytical techniques that would define the early years of his career at Corning, and yet the scope of his interest within glass remained vast. Indeed, 1961 saw Brill pen a letter to Nature with a colleague, that was a ‘bombshell’, according to Newton, in the field of glass-dating (1971, 3). Here Brill suggested that the rather enigmatic weathering crust found to form on buried glass objects over time could be used to date the object in a method rather similar to dendrochronology, using the separate layers of the shiny lamination (Brill 1961, Brill and Hood 1961, Newton 1971). Whilst in dendrochronology the tree-rings account simply for the tree’s annual growth, in the weathering crust on glass Brill suggested the accumulation of a layer of laminate might respond to some kind of annual event of climatic change (Brill 1961). Unfortunately, despite the examples of the method’s successful applications provided by Brill, such as the almost accurate count of 156 layers on a bottle-base from the York River submerged in 1781 and excavated in 1935, the technique largely failed to convince and did not see widespread adoption (Brill 1961, Newton 1971).
Isotope analysis
The most important of these techniques would prove to be Brill’s pioneering application of lead isotope analysis, hitherto used only in geology, to archaeological objects. Brill first presented this idea at the 1965 Seminar in Examination of Works of Art, held at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, but the first widely published account of the method seems to be Brill and Wampler’s 1967 article in the American Journal of Archaeology. Here, Brill and Wampler outlined how the technique could be used to provenance the lead contents of archaeological objects to lead ore sources around the world, based on the isotopic signature of various leads, which relates them to ‘ores occurring in different geographical areas’ (1967, 63). These different areas have different signatures because they are of varying geological age, something reflected by the individual lead isotopes which form only after the radioactive decay of uranium and thorium (Brill et al. 1965, Brill and Wampler 1967). While the lead isotope ratios used for provenancing are different, they are not unique: areas geologically similar will yield similar lead isotope signatures (Brill 1970). Furthermore, if leads were salvaged and mixed in ancient times, the isotope ratio will be compromised (Brill 1970). Aside from these two limitations, there is little else that could affect the lead isotope reading an object would yield. As such, Brill’s method was greeted enthusiastically and he went on to develop the technique, as well as oxygen isotope analysis, in his 1970 publication. Here he demonstrated how the technique could be used both to classify early glasses and to a certain extent characterize the ingredients from which they were made (1970, 143).
Chemical-analytical Round Robin
In 1965 Brill launched another important innovation in glass analysis, the comparison of interlaboratory experiments in order to verify analytical results (Brill 1965). ‘Originally inspired by a plea from W E S Turner’, according to Freestone, Brill first mooted his idea at the VIIth International Congress on Glass, in Brussels (Brill 1965a, I. Freestone, pers. comm. 2009). It wasn’t until the VIIIth International Congress on Glass in 1968, however, that Brill fully launched his concept of an ‘analytical round robin’, having distributed a number of reference glasses to be tested in different laboratories using a range of current techniques including X-ray fluorescence and neutron activation analysis (1968, 49). When discussing his motive for the experiment, Brill aptly stated: ‘The truth is that the chemical analysis of glasses is a difficult undertaking and still remains in some senses an art’ (1968, 49). By conducting the round robin experiment, Brill hoped the results gathered from different laboratories would help ‘correlate […] earlier results’ and ‘calibrate future analyses in reference to one another’, as well as suggest which out of the analytical procedures used was the most accurate and effective (1968, 49). The results of the round robin were presented at the ‘IXth International Congress on Glass’ in 1971, and showed that, as Brill suspected, there was poor agreement between certain identified elements, and therefore these might be ‘troublesome’ generally across analyses (1971, 97). These included calcium, aluminum, lead, barium & others (Brill 1971). Aside from their correctional potential, the results, from 45 different laboratories in 15 countries, also provided an enormous data set from which, Brill suggested, the participants could ‘evaluate their own methods and procedures against the findings of other analysts’ (1971, 97). At the time, Brill could hardly have suspected that the data would go on to have such great import, but Croegaard’s generation of preferred glass compositions, from statistical analysis of the data, were used successfully by many people until Brill’s own reference guide was published in 1999 (I. Freestone, ‘pers. comm.’, 2009).
The Middle East
Brill made various forays to the Middle East, including accompanying Wertime’s 1968 survey of the ancient technologies of Iran, alongside other great minds such as the noted ceramicist, Frederick Matson (UCL Institute for Archaeo-Metallurgical Studies 2007). In the years 1963-1964, the Corning Museum of Glass and the University of Missouri, following a long history of excavation at the necropolis of Beth She’Arim, conducted an examination of a huge slab of glass, some 2000 years old, that had been languishing in an ancient cistern (Brill and Wosinski 1965). Brill cannot recall who first suggested this slab, measuring 3.4m by 1.94m, could be made of glass, but the only way to test it was to drill a core through its 45 cm thickness and analyse it (Brill 1967, Brill and Wosinski 1965). On analysis of the core, Brill found that the glass was devitrified and stained, and not very homogenous, with a presence of wollastonite crystals throughout (1965, 219.2). Investigation of the manufacture technology required to produce the slab, suggested that in order to produce such a slab of glass, it would have been necessary to heat over eleven tons of batch material, and sustain it at around 1050˚C for between five and ten days (Brill 1967)! His initial interpretation was that the glass must have been heated either from above or from the sides using a kind of tank furnace; a hypothesis that was proven accurate when excavation underneath the slab suggested it had been melted in situ, in a tank whose floor was a bed of limestone blocks with a thin parting layer of clay (Brill and Wosinski 1965, Brill 1967). Brill’s interpretation, that the slab and its surroundings suggest ‘some early form of reverberatory furnace’ was the first suggestion of the use of tank furnaces in early glassmaking (1967, 92). The evidence at Beth She’arim encouraged further innovative thought because whilst the slab represented glass production on a grand scale, no associated evidence for glass working was found. Brill had already suspected that historical glassmaking occurred in two phases, the heavy ‘engineering’ stage when the glass is formed from the batch ingredients and the ‘crafting’ stage when the glass is formed into artefacts (Brill, pers. comm., 2009). These stages could occur in combination at one location, or at two differing locales, and the time span of production after the initial glass melt is highly flexible. For Brill, the idea of this ‘dual nature of all glassmaking’ was ‘crystallized’ at Beth She’Arim, where only the raw glass production was represented, and would be reinforced later by the contrasting evidence, where working was favoured over production, found at Jalame.
Jalame
One of the on-running projects of the Corning Museum of Glass published the excavation report from their many field seasons at the ancient glass factory in Jalame, in Late Roman Palestine (Brill 1988, Schreurs and Brill 1984). Brill was called upon to conduct scientific investigations of the huge amount of material generated at the site, in order to exploit the full potential of the artefacts; after all, the site was being excavated specifically because of its role as a glass factory (Brill 1988). Of the vast quantity of glass fragments from Jalame, both vessel sherds and cullet, most were aqua and green and all were soda-lime-silica glasses melted in highly reducing conditions (Schreurs and Brill 1984). Where the melting conditions had been increasingly reducing, a ferri-sulfide chromophore complex was shown to have formed, thus changing the bluey-aqua colour of the glass to an olive, or even an amber shade (Schreurs and Brill 1984). Despite these colour variations, Brill’s further chemical analysis showed the vessel glasses to be highly homogeneous in composition, apart from a clear divide where around 40 glasses demonstrated the intentional addition of manganese (Brill 1988). Brill conducted an investigation of the furnace at Jalame, nicknamed the Red Room, in which there was a mysterious absence of glass finds of any kind (Brill 1988). Whilst work at Beth She’Arim had eventually found there to be five firing chambers responsible for heating the one tank, the fragmentary remains at Jalame made it very difficult to interpret the furnace set-up, apart from the fact that they believed there to have been only one firing chamber (Brill 1988). The Institute of Nautical Archaeology In the late eighties Brill was to contribute various studies to the Institute of Nautical Archaeology, following the excavation of a number of exciting shipwrecks including the Serçe Liman, and the Ulu Burun (Barnes et al. 1986, Brill 1989). Here Brill’s own technique of lead isotope analysis was to provide a means for provenancing items aboard ship, and thus determine the ship’s origin and her ports-of-call. The excavators of the Serçe Liman wanted to know whether she was Byzantine or Islamic, a complicated question for lead isotope analysis as the lead ores of the Eastern Mediterranean share geographical characteristics and therefore overlap (Barnes et al. 1986). Using 900 lead net sinkers divided into six loose groupings, Brill found groups III, V and VI to be Byzantine, that is with ores found in modern-day Turkey (Barnes et al. 1986). Group I, however, was taken to be most indicative of the ship’s origin; this group contained net sinkers, but also two ceramic glazes and three glass vessels, all sharing virtually identical lead ores with only one isotopic match, ‘an ore from Anguran, northwest of Tehran’ according to Barnes et al. (1986, 7).
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Al-Jalama, Beth Shearim
Industrial Activity: glass making
Material Composition: Glass
Gophna, Ram
Gophna, Ram Image
Professor Emeritus, Tel Aviv University
Education
MA – Hebrew University, 1964 Ph.D. – Tel Aviv University, 1974 Ph.D. Dissertation: The Settlement of the Coastal Plain of Eretz-Israel during the Early Bronze Age.
Fields of Research
Settlement Archeaology of Israel during the Chalcolithic and the Early Bronze-Intermediate Bronze Ages
Current Projects
Settlement, Urbanization and Social Change Processes During the Chalcolithic and the Early Bronze Age in the Central Coastal Plain of Israel Selected Publications  
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Tel Tsaf, Tel Aviv University
Historical Research Focus: Chalcolithic 4500 BC – 3150 BC
Settlement Types: Village
Goren-Inbar, Naama
Goren-Inbar, Naama Image
Naama Goren-Inbar (born July 20, 1948) is  an Israeli archaeologist and paleoanthropologist and Professor Emeritus at the Institute of Archaeology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Goren-Inbar excavated many important prehistoric sites in Israel including the Acheulian site of Gesher Benot Ya’aqov. In 2014, she received the EMET Prize in Humanities and Judaism, and in 2016 was elected to the Israel Academy of Sciences.
Early life and education
Naama Goren-Inbar was born in Jerusalem in 1948 to Rachel and Yaakov Goren (author). After completing her military service, she began studying toward her first degree in archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where she also earned her MA and PhD (1981). Goren-Inbar’s PhD dissertation (supervised by Professor Ofer Bar-Yosef) was dedicated to the study of the lithic assemblage of the Acheulian site of ‘Ubeiydia.[1] She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of California, Berkeley under Professor Glynn Isaac. In 1984, Goren-Inbar began teaching at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She was appointed associate professor in 1992 and full professor in 1997. From 2002-2005, she served as the head of the university’s Institute of Archaeology.
Scientific contributions
Early in her career, Goren-Inbar participated in excavations at the Lower Paleolithic site of ‘Ubeiydia in the Jordan Valley (the oldest site in Israel), at prehistoric sites in the northern Sinai Desert, at Hayonim Cave in the Galilee, as well as in ethnographic surveys in the southern Sinai Peninsula. In the late 1970s, Goren-Inbar excavated the Acheulian site of HaLashon near Kibbutz Kfar Menahem. During 1981-1982, she excavated the Acheulian site of Berekhat Ram in the Northern Golan Heights. The archaeological layer of the site, discovered by D. Ben Ami, is stratified between two basalt flows. The lower flow is dated by the Argon/Argon method to 800,000 years before present. The upper flow, sealing the archaeological layer from above, is dated to 233,000 years before present, setting a minimum age for the layers. When excavating, Goren-Inbar exposed the Venus of Berekhat Ram, a tuff pebble figurine of a woman, considered the earliest symbolic representation (art) in human history. From 1982 to 1985, Goren-Inbar directed the excavation of the Middle Paleolithic site of Quneitra, located in the Northern Golan Heights near the Israeli-Syrian border. Excavation at the site, dated to the final stage of the Middle Paleolithic, c. 55,000 before present, exposed a rich lithic assemblage accompanied by a wealth of animal bones including giant bovids. A notable find is a flint cobble on which a pattern of concentric circles was carved, one of the earliest and rarest examples for Middle Paleolithic art in the Levant. In 1989, Goren-Inbar initiated her excavation project at the Acheulian site of Gesher Benot Ya’aqov (GBY), located on the banks of the Jordan River south of the Hula Valley. The site, excavated during seven seasons from 1989 to 1997, is dated to 780,000 years before present by the presence in its layer of the last paleo-magnetic reversal.[2] The primary finds at GBY include a butchered, straight tusk elephant, indicating the early hominins’ ability to process large game.[3] In addition, a minimum of seven fallow deer carcasses exposed in a single layer of GBY Area C evidence the large game hunting of numerous animals. The cut marks made on the bones by the flint knives of the site’s butchers demonstrate that they used a butchering method similar to that of modern humans.[4] A rich and unique assemblage of bifacial tools (handaxes and cleavers) suggest an African origin for the stone tool tradition of the site’s knappers. The tools were shaped from basaltflint, and limestone, evidence of the high cognitive abilities of the inhabitants of GBY.[5] The site’s findings also include the earliest evidence for systematic, controlled use of fire outside of Africa.[6] The sediments of the site have been waterlogged since their accumulation, creating anaerobic conditions enabling the exceptional preservation of botanical remains, including pollen, seeds, fruits, and wood. Analysis of these remains led to a unique reconstruction of the nearly one million year-old environment on the banks of the Paleo-Hula Lake. Among the botanic remains are seven species of edible nuts. Excavation at GBY exposed pitted stones identified as pitted anvils or nutting stones, ancient nut crackers. This is the earliest evidence for a vegetarian component of the human diet.[7] Goren-Inbar’s excavation and research is published in hundreds of papers and in a series of books. She established the importance of GBY as a milestone in the study of human evolution during the Acheulian. Goren-Inbar’s study of Early Paleolithic diet, migration out-of-Africa, lithic technology and tradition, and reconstruction of the paleoenvironment has placed her as a leading authority on early human behavior and evolution. Her primary contribution is in establishing the presence of sophisticated technology, modern behavior, and advanced cognitive abilities within the framework of the early Paleolithic, pushing the chronology of such phenomena hundreds of thousands of years back in time.
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Gesher Benot Ya‘aqov (GBY), Hebrew University
Historical Research Focus: Early Paleolithic 150000 BC – 80000 BC
Material Composition: Flint
Kenyon, Kathleen Mary
Kenyon, Kathleen Mary Image
Dame Kathleen Mary Kenyon, 1906-1978
As a member of the Council of the British School of Archaeology in Jerusalem, Dame Kenyon was involved in the efforts to reopen the School after WWII. In January, 1951 she travelled to Jordan and undertook excavations at Jericho on behalf of the BSAJ. Her work at Jericho, between 1952 until 1958, made her famous. There she made ground-breaking discoveries concerning the Neolithic cultures of the Levant. In this period also she completed the publication of the excavations at Samaria. Samaria Sebaste III: The Objects, appeared in 1957. Then, from 1961 to 1967 she excavated in Jerusalem.
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: The Palestine Exploration Fund, Jericho
Historical Research Focus: Late Bronze (LB) 1500 BC – 1200 BC
Material Composition: Pottery
Kochavi, Moshe
Kochavi, Moshe Image
Moshe Kochavi, was a founding faculty member of Tel Aviv University‘s Department of Archaeology and Near Eastern Studies. Born in Bucharest, Romania, Kochavi began studying archeology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1955 under Yohanan Aharoni, and received his Ph.D. from that institution. After the 1967 Six-Day War Kochavi carried out the first thorough survey of the Judean Hills. In 1968 he joined Tel Aviv University’s Department of Archaeology. He led Tel Aviv University’s excavation at Tel Hadar between 1987 and 1995 as part of the Land of Geshur Project. Kochavi was one of numerous archaeologists who in 2007 petitioned the Supreme Court of Israel to order an immediate cessation of digging operations being performed by the Jerusalem Islamic Waqf on the Temple Mount. Works
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Tel Aviv University
Aharoni, Yohanan Image
Aharoni, Yohanan
Yohanan Aharoni was bom in Germany, June 7, 1919, and immigrated to Palestine in 1933. He began his public archeological career as Antiquities Inspector for Galilee, representing t… Read More
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Tel Aviv University, Ramat Rahel, Tel Hazor
Bar-Yosef, Ofer Image
Bar-Yosef, Ofer
Ofer Bar-Yosef is an Israeli archaeologist and anthropologist whose main field of study is the Palaeolithic period. He was Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology at Hebrew University in Jerusalem since 1967, the institution where he originall… Read More
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Hebrew University
Historical Research Focus: Middle Paleolithic 80000 BC – 40000 BC
Brill, Robert H. Image
Brill, Robert H.
Dr Robert Brill is in the field of archaeological science, best known for his work on the chemical analysis of ancient … Read More
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Al-Jalama, Beth Shearim
Industrial Activity: glass making
Material Composition: Glass
Gophna, Ram Image
Gophna, Ram
Professor Emeritus, Tel Aviv University Education MA – Hebrew University, 1964 Ph.D. – Tel Aviv Universi… Read More
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Tel Tsaf, Tel Aviv University
Historical Research Focus: Chalcolithic 4500 BC – 3150 BC
Settlement Types: Village
Goren-Inbar, Naama Image
Goren-Inbar, Naama
Naama Goren-Inbar (born July 20, 1948) is  an Israeli archaeologist and paleoanthropologist and Professor Emeritus at the Institute of Archaeology, The … Read More
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Gesher Benot Ya‘aqov (GBY), Hebrew University
Historical Research Focus: Early Paleolithic 150000 BC – 80000 BC
Material Composition: Flint
Kenyon, Kathleen Mary Image
Kenyon, Kathleen Mary
Dame Kathleen Mary Kenyon, 1906-1978 As a member of the Council of the British School of Archaeology in Jerusalem, Dame Kenyon was involved in the e… Read More
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: The Palestine Exploration Fund, Jericho
Historical Research Focus: Late Bronze (LB) 1500 BC – 1200 BC
Material Composition: Pottery
Kochavi, Moshe Image
Kochavi, Moshe
Moshe Kochavi, was a founding faculty member of Tel Aviv University’s Department of Archaeology and Near Eastern Studies. Born in … Read More
Category: 1948 – 1980
Tags: Tel Aviv University